Publications and Guides

A Practical Guide for CUPE Members on how to use the Freedom of Information Legislation in Saskatchewan

  • CUPE’s research department has released a 24-page guide to assist members and other residents navigate the province’s freedom of information acts.  A Practical Guide for CUPE Members on how to use the Freedom of Information Legislation in Saskatchewan is dedicated to Joe Kuchta, Owls and Roosters blogger and tireless public information activist, who died in November 2011 in Saskatoon. May we all be inspired by his pursuit of the truth.

 

Union Membership Makes an Economy Built to Last

  • Union members are not alone in recognizing the benefits unions and their members make to the economy.  In a two-page article featured in the Fall 2012 issue of Business Regina Magazine, Driven Automotive – a local Regina small business – also agrees that good union jobs and good wages make for a healthy local economy.  Driven Automotive is located on the 500 block of Broad Street in Regina.

 

Asking the Right Questions: A Guide for Municipalities Considering P3s

  • A new guide from the CUPE encourages municipal officials to show caution in considering the use of public-private partnerships to finance public infrastructure projects.  The reference document provides essential information to assist municipalities in making sound decisions in the best interest of their citizens.

 

The Trouble with The Amicus Deal

  • Economist John Loxley calculates the costs of the Saskatchewan government’s controversial funding arrangement with Amicus Health Care Inc. and concludes it is an expensive way to finance long-term care facilities in the province.  At the time, Health Minister Don McMorris said he hoped the new funding arrangement would become a model for constructing and operating other long-term care facilities in the province.  But that model – known as a public private partnership (P3) – proves to be a costly mistake, projected to cost taxpayers as much as $20 million more than if the government had used traditional public sector financing.